Prince Markie Dee Passes Away In Miami


Prince Markie Dee, member of the Fat Boys, who released some of hip-hop’s most commercially successful albums of the 80s died at the age of 52.

In the 80s, the Fat Boys were one of hip-hop's top groups, with their 1987 album “Crushin’” which went platinum featuring the collaboration with the Beach Boys, “Wipeout,” their biggest hit, that reached No. 12 on the Billboard Hot 100.

That year, the group also starred in the feature film “Disorderlies.” The group charted massive hits including “Jailhouse Rap,” “Stick ‘Em” and “Can You Feel It.”

Prince Markie Dee born Mark Anthony Morales on Feb. 19, 1968. Formed the Disco 3 in the early 80s along with Darren (the Human Beat Box) Robinson and Damon (Kool Rock Ski) Wimbley. They won a 1983 talent show at Radio City Music Hall, and changed their name to Fat Boys.

The group released seven full length albums; in addition to their platinum “Crushin’,” three went gold. The group appeared on the Fresh Fest tour, which was the first hip-hop arena tour and appeared in the film “Krush Groove” and “Knights of the City” before breaking up in the early 1990s.

Prince Markie Dee released a pair of solo albums in the 90s, and the hit single “Typical Reasons (Swing My Way).” He began to work as a songwriter and producer for Uptown Records, and collaborated with Father MC and Mary J. Blige. He wrote on and produce Blige’s 92 hit “Real Love” and worked on her debut album, “What’s the 411?” He also worked on songs and remixes for Destiny’s Child, Mariah Carey and others.

Later he found his way into radio as an on air personality here at 1035 The Beat. Love and respect to one of the great pioneers of hip hop who opened the doors of the pop world to the artform that dominates today.

RIP Markie Dee

Photos by Getty Images


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