The remnants of Hurricane Irma are still bullying parts of the country. 

The National Hurricane Center said it still expects Irma to drop 5 inches to 8 inches of rain across South Carolina and the northern regions of Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi through Tuesday.

Irma forced Atlanta's international airport - one of the world's busiest - to cancel nearly 200 flights early Tuesday. 

The flights canceled at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport put the total number of interrupted trips there due to Irma at about 1,300, spokesman Andrew Gobeil said. 

Meteorologist Keith Stellman said Atlanta's airport recorded sustained winds of 45 mph with gusts up to 64 mph . 

In Atlanta, people nervously watched towering oak trees as the city, 250 miles inland, experienced its first tropical storm warning. 

Weakened into a tropical depression after strafing Florida, Irma still had enough force when it swirled into Georgia to cause significant damage.